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How to Fix Common Hearing Aid Problems

Hardware can always be susceptible to technical difficulties, and hearing aids are no exception. They are complicated pieces of machinery and sometimes hearing aid wearers can encounter issues with their hearing aids. Hearing aids can get wet, they can start making funny noises, or they can stop working altogether. Keep reading to find some solutions to common hearing aid problems!

If Your Hearing Aid Stops Working…

While it may seem obvious, the first step to take if your hearing aid is not working is to check that it’s on! Once you’ve established that your hearing aid has a working battery, check to make sure the battery is inserted correctly and that your hearing aid turns on when the battery door is shut. If you’re not sure whether the battery is charged or not, try a new battery and see if you hear a chime when the battery door shuts. Changing the battery is one of the easiest methods of hearing aid repair. If you’re sure that the hearing aid is on and the battery is working properly, checked the tubing and the ear mold to make sure there is no wax or moisture clogging up your hearing aid.

If the Sound is Too Weak…

If you’re encountering a sound issue with your hearing aid, the first thing is to check your dome for earwax. Your dome could be clogged up with earwax and need replacing. If your dome is starting to look yellow in color, it is likely time to replace it. If you have a RIC hearing aid, you should take off your dome and check the wax guard beneath it (the small white circular piece of plastic) to see if it is clogged. The wax guard on your hearing aid can be replaced easily with the small black plastic tool that was included in your hearing aid purchase.

If you have an open-fit hearing aid, such as the Dia, you should check your tube to see if there is any earwax inside—this could block sound from reaching your ear. If the tube is clogged, you will need to replace it; you can purchase new tubes on our website or send your hearing aid in for a cleaning! Alternatively, you can clean out the tube using the small blue plastic piping that was included with your hearing aid. Run this piece of plastic through the center of your tube to push out any dried earwax.

If all of the above solutions sound a bit daunting, you can simply purchase the Audicus Clean & Care package and have us take a look at your hearing aid for you. Once we receive your hearing aid, we will clean out any earwax buildup, replace the domes, replace the wax guards, replace the batteries, and send you back a full new pack!

 If Your Hearing Aid Gets Wet…

A common hearing aid problem is when hearing aids get wet. If you accidentally wore them in the shower or just spent too long in a very humid environment, it can affect your hearing aids and may cause permanent damage to the devices. Luckily, there are steps you can take for hearing aid repair! Let your hearing aids air-dry, or put them in a bowl of uncooked rice to absorb the moisture. Check out this post for an in-depth look at how to approach wet hearing aids.

If Your Hearing Aid Starts Making Noises…

Are your hearing aids making a whistling noise? Commonly called “feedback,” this noise is often due to improperly-fitting ear molds. Take out the mold and re-insert it in your ear. The whistling noise should stop once the device is fitted correctly inside your ear. Changing the dome size of your hearing aid might also help; if the dome does not form a sung-fit in your ear, it can cause sounds to leak out and air to make uncomfortable noises. Whistling can also be caused by a buildup of wax.

If you’re hearing a buzzing noise, it’s possible that you accidentally turned on the loop (telecoil) setting. Check that you haven’t activated the loop setting, and if you have, switch back to the normal microphone setting.

Most common hearing aid problems can be solved by refitting your ear mold, checking for wax or moisture, inspecting the tubing for blockage or damage, and replacing the battery in your hearing aid. If these solutions don’t fix your issue, be sure to contact your audiologist for help—there could be something inside the device that is malfunctioning, and you’ll want to get it checked right away!

By: Elena McPhillips

11 responses to “How to Fix Common Hearing Aid Problems

  1. My mom has been having trouble hearing lately, and I think it’s her hearing aid. I’ll have to talk to her about cleaning it out to see if it’s just earwax buildup. I’ll have to look into new hearing aids if that’s not the case. Thanks for sharing!

  2. How do you keep these hearing aids from falling out? I lost one of mine several times and the last time I lost it, I was unable to find it. What shall I do as I cannot afford to buy another as it was less than Six months old, and had not finished paying for it!

    1. Hi Ann,

      Do you have retention guards on your hearing aids (if they are BTE)? This will help them stay in your ear by acting as a kick-stand, if you will. If you have Audicus hearing aids and you need a new retention guard, let us know. Call us at (888) 979 – 6918.


  3. My grandpa has been telling me that his hearing aids haven’t been working, I guess I never thought to check it for earwax. It sounds pretty weird to look at someone else’s hearing aid, but it’s my grandpa so I like to help. If that doesn’t work, then maybe I can just buy him a new pair of hearing aids.

  4. I have had 2 hearing aid test in the last year. Have been to 2 different places of business that sell the aids and both were from 45 hundred to 65 hundred dollars. My purchase with Audicus was 699.00 for the Canto left ear only. Why is there such a big difference in price. The Canto is ok but I still have problems with sounds. Cannot afford thousands of dollars and wanted to try a less expensive unit to get some help. Ins. does nothing to help with cost..

  5. All very helpful hints about aides. I have an Audicus set of aides and just love them…have had another brand for 4 or 5 years at double the price which are not half as good. Howver,I still have trouble with them falling out because of my glasses, I presume….I was told my left ear canal is larger than the right so need some larger domes. The retetention guards are very stubborn about staying in the crevice of my lobe. where are they supposed to be attached so they lie down with ease and not always pop out. Thanks..from a happy customer.

    1. About your hearing aids fallling out. Mine did that when I first got them. I figured out (no help from the specalist) that my ear wire was too short and my dome was too small and when both those were changed they stopped falling out so I would try that. When you wear glsses sometimes the ear wire on the eye glasses causes a problem and perhaps changing your eye glBsses with a different ear piece (the plastic kind that do not go around the ear might make a difference) Let us know

    2. I just started wearing new Dia II aids. The instructions tell me not to clip the ends too short, so I only trimmed a little at a time. Still, after I have them on for several hours I noticed I started messing with my ears. I finally figured out it was because the ends of the extensions that fold into the bowl of the ear were punching into my skin causing my ears to ache. I am concerned I will cut them too short. How short is too short? I end up just letting them stick out of my ear.

  6. My father has had a pair of hearing aids for 5 years and recently the plastic tube that connects the behind the ear part of the hearing aide to the earmold has begun to fall out of the hole it normally is in. I don’t know what substance to use to “glue” it back into the hole without ruining the earmold. The store where he bought them is more than 100 miles away and taking him back to the store is not an option as he is 95.

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